Dying Words

To the well-organized mind, death is but the next great adventure.

J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

Life isn’t fair, it’s just fairer than death, that’s all.

William Goldman, The Princess Bride

Winning means fame and fortune, Losing means certain death, The Hunger Games have begun…..

Suzanne Collins, The Hunger Games

Everybody going to be dead one day, just give them time.

Neil Gaiman, Anansi Boys

It kills me sometimes, how people die.

Markus Zusak, The Book Thief

After all, what’s a life, anyway? We’re born, we live a little while, we die.

E.B. White, Charlotte’s Web

“So it’s your death suit.”
“Correct. Don’t you have a death outfit?”
“Yeah,” I said. “It’s a dress I bought for my fifteenth birthday party. But I don’t wear it on dates.”
His eyes lit up. “We’re on a date?” he asked.
I looked down, feeling bashful. “Don’t push it.”

John Green, The Fault in Our Stars

When someone you love dies, and you’re not expecting it, you don’t lose her all at once; you lose her in pieces over a long time—the way the mail stops coming, and her scent fades from the pillows and even from the clothes in her closet and drawers. Gradually, you accumulate the parts of her that are gone. Just when the day comes—when there’s a particular missing part that overwhelms you with the feeling that she’s gone, forever—there comes another day, and another specifically missing part.

John Irving, A Prayer for Owen Meany

It is useless for me to describe to you how terrible Violet, Klaus, and even Sunny felt in the time that followed. If you have ever lost someone very important to you, then you already know how it feels, and if you haven’t, you cannot possibly imagine it.

Lemony Snicket, The Bad Beginning

It is a curious thing, the death of a loved one. We all know that our time in this world is limited, and that eventually all of us will end up underneath some sheet, never to wake up. And yet it is always a surprise when it happens to someone we know. It is like walking up the stairs to your bedroom in the dark, and thinking there is one more stair than there is. Your foot falls down, through the air, and there is a sickly moment of dark surprise as you try and readjust the way you thought of things.

Lemony Snicket, Horseradish: Bitter Truths You Can’t Avoid

It is the unknown we fear when we look upon death and darkness, nothing more.

J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

You attend the funeral, you bid the dead farewell. You grieve. Then you continue with your life. And at times the fact of her absence will hit you like a blow to the chest, and you will weep. But this will happen less and less as time goes on. She is dead. You are alive. So live.

Neil Gaiman: The Sandman, Vol. 6: Fables and Reflections

Even death has a heart.

Markus Zusak, The Book Thief

“Death’s got an Invisibility Cloak?” Harry interrupted again.
“So he can sneak up on people,” said Ron. “Sometimes he gets bored of running at them, flapping his arms and shrieking…”

J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

District Twelve. Where you can starve to death in safety.

Suzanne Collins, The Hunger Games

If you gave someone your heart and they died, did they take it with them? Did you spend the rest of forever with a hole inside you that couldn’t be filled?”

Jodi Picoult, Nineteen Minutes

What I love about the sculpture is that it makes the bones that we are always walking and playing on manifest, like in a world that so often denies the reality of death and the reality that we are surrounded by and outnumbered by the dead. Here, is a very playful way of acknowledging that and acknowledging that and that always, whenever we play, whenever we live, we are living in both literal and metaphorical ways on the memory and bones of the dead.

John Green, The Fault in Our Stars

“Does it hurt?”‘ The childish question had escaped Harry’s lips before he could stop it.

“Dying? Not at all,” said Sirius. “Quicker and easier than falling asleep.”

J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

I found myself thinking about President William McKinley, the third American president to be assassinated. He lived for several days after he was shot, and towards the end, his wife started crying and screaming, “I want to go too! I want to go too!” And with his last measure of strength, McKinley turned to her and spoke his last words: “We are all going.”

John Green, Looking for Alaska

When you’re dead, they really fix you up. I hope to hell when I do die somebody has sense enough to just dump me in the river or something. Anything except sticking me in a goddam cemetery. People coming and putting a bunch of flowers on your stomach on Sunday, and all that crap. Who wants flowers when you’re dead? Nobody.

J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

I imagined the Augustus Waters analysis of that comment: If I am playing basketball in heaven, does that imply a physical location of a heaven containing physical basketballs? Who makes the basketballs in question? Are there less fortunate souls in heaven who work in a celestial basketball factory so that I can play? Or did an omnipotent God create the basketballs out of the vacuum of space? Is this heaven in some kind of unobservable universe where the laws of physics don’t apply, and if so, why in the hell would I be playing basketball when I could be flying or reading or looking at beautiful people or something else I actually enjoy? It’s almost as if the way you imagine my dead self says more about you than either the person I was or whatever I am now.

John Green, The Fault in Our Stars

“Stars,” she whispered. “I can see the stars again, my lady.”
A tear trickled down Artemis’s cheek. “Yes, my brave one. They are beautiful tonight.”
Stars,” Zoe repeated. Her eyes fixed on the night sky. And she did not move again.”

Rick Riordan, The Titan’s Curse

I felt the unfairness of it, the inarguable injustice of loving someone who might have loved you back but can’t due to deadness.

John Green, Looking for Alaska

When he shall die,
Take him and cut him out in little stars,
And he will make the face of heaven so fine
That all the world will be in love with night
And pay no worship to the garish sun.

William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet

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